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Deer Park


© 2008
BASID #788

Beth Ames Swartz
Deer Park
acrylic and mixed media on canvas
72" x 48" (1.83m x 1.22m)
2008

 

 

 

王維  (Wang Wei, 701–761 a.c.e., Chinese)

 

 

鹿柴

(Deer Park)*

 

 

空山不見人

Empty mountains:

 

no one to be seen.

但聞人語響

Yet—hear—

 

human sounds and echoes.

返景入深林

Returning sunlight

 

enters the dark woods;

復照青苔上

Again shining

 

on the green moss, above.

 

 

 

Gary Snyder, 1978

 

 

 

 

En la Ermita del Parque de los Venados

In the Deer Park Hermitage

 

 

No se ve gente en este monte,

No people are seen on this mountain,

sólo se oyen, lejos, voces.

Only voices, far-off, are heard.

Bosque profundo. Luz poniente:

Deep forest. Western light:

alumbra el musgo y, verde, asciende.

It illuminates the moss and, green, rises.

 

 

 

Octavio Paz, 1978** 

 

 

 

 

 

*        The Chinese title of the poem, Lu zhai, is a place-name. It probably alludes to Deer Park in Sarnath (in Uttar Pradesh, India.), where the Gautama Buddha preached his first sermon.

**      At least twenty-four English translations exist of this elusive and allusive poem by a major Tang poet whose poetry speaks of the Buddhist and Taoist ideals of retreat and life amidst nature.